Still Wondering How Trump Won? Try Psychographic Targeting

You wake up, yawn, stretch. Pick up the phone. Check Facebook. “Like.” “Like.” “Like,” again.
After 10 “likes,” Michal Kosinski knows you better than your work colleagues. After 70, he knows you better than your partner does, including -- whether these things were explicitly referenced in your clicks or not -- your skin color, your sexual orientation, whether you’re a Democrat or a Republican, whether you smoke or do drugs… The list goes on.

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Kaila Colbin
Under Science-Unfriendly Administration, Internet And Its Data Are In Your Hands

In the final days of 2016, the website of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources got a bit of a refresh.
Unless you were paying close attention, you might have missed it. After all, most people don’t regularly visit the Wisconsin DNR. But the changes were caught by a website-monitoring service and shared on some blogs, starting with a guy named James Rowen.

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As World Gets More Automated, We Have A Bigger Problem Than Losing Our Jobs

I attended a funeral today.
I knew him casually. We frequented many of the same social and business circles, and had had more than one good chat about our social and political environment. But we had never graduated to the category of close friendship.

So it was wonderful to hear from his father, from his sister, from his daughter, from his childhood friends. Over an hour and a half, I got to know him better. I got to know how successful he was. How loved and respected he was. How tortured he was.

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Kaila Colbin
Security And Privacy Concerns Not Just A Yahoo Problem

“Yahoo: Time of death, oh about a week ago,” said the headline in the IT Professionals newsletter I just got. The reason? The hacking that compromised up to a billion accounts. The secret backdoor access so the company could scan every email coming through the system, looking for certain keywords flagged by the Feds. The general “aimless wandering” of the company.

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Theranos & Hampton Creek: Two Stories Too Good To Be True

How do you measure success?

If you were to say to someone, “That guy is really successful,” what would you mean? Is he rich? Does he own a big company? Has he made an impact in the world?

Different cultures measure success in different ways. In a fascinating Business Insider piece from 2014, Richard Lewis pointed out that for Americans, Germans and Swiss, more time spent working equals more success, “[while in] a society such as existed in the Soviet Union, one could postulate that those who achieved substantial remuneration by working little (or not at all) were the most successful of all.”

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Facebook's Censorship Of Napalm Girl Is History Repeating

She’s known as the “Napalm Girl,” and she appears in a photograph called "The Terror of War," taken by Nick Ut. In it, she is young, naked and clearly terrified.

Ut won the Pulitzer Prize for the photo in 1973, which is credited with turning the tide of public opinion and leading to the end of the Vietnam War.

This picture -- this image of unfathomably vast historical importance, of undeniably significant social commentary -- was removed from Facebook last week, when the social network’s algorithms detected the nudity and deleted it from the account of the Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten, which had posted the image.

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